Building structure with Acantus Spinosissimus in an empty yard?

Question by dumbdumb: Building structure with Acantus Spinosissimus in an empty yard?
My summer clients lacked focal points in their yard. I saw some Acantus Spinosissimus on the dollar bagain table at a high end nusery and began dreaming.

Natually I did not pass up the bargain, but I have no expericence in with this plant. When I got home I looked up its characteristics. It sounds very prolific…It’s like the cold virus of the plant world.

I found a hard place for it to thrive “to well” just about 6 feet away from a fence in super sandy lifeless soil.

My main purpose was to cover up a hideous white gas tank which is too visible fron any window in the house.

I bought the plant leafless. Its sprouting already. Additionally, the root ball looked alive and vigorous (4 definitive balls, huge, in a four inch pot).

Do I have a “Suddenly Seymour” on my hands?

I read the roots can be troublesome.

Yet I needed something for my clients yard, since they have no “focal” in their yard.

I planted it with hosta (type unknown, early bloomer)

plant pics welcome

Read answers:

Answer by Rita
PLANT IN ORDINARY GARDEN SOIL
MUST BE WELL-DRAINED
FULL SUN TO PART SHADE
GROWS 3-4 FEET TALL
MULCH WELL IN COLDER ZONES
PROVIDE SOME SHADE IN HOTTEST AREAS
SLUGS AND SNAILS CAN BE A PROBLEM
THEY DON’T LIKE WET WINTER CONDITIONS
TAKE ROOT CUTTINGS/DIVISIONS IN SPRING
HARDY IN ZONES 7 – 10 (US)
The last link is about the hosta.
I hope they don’t have kids because it says it supposed to have spines on the stalks(Acanthus Spinosissimus).

What do you think?

3 Responses to “Building structure with Acantus Spinosissimus in an empty yard?”

  1. Dragon says:

    Not noxious, very attractive. If you want to slow them down don’t give them heaps of water. They still look good, and stay happy but produce a smaller plant all over. Very hardy once established due to heavy duty roots.

  2. John Denson, RLA says:

    Acanthus is a sturdy architectural plant for part shade. While it does have a reputation for being a strong grower, I would not describe it as invasive. New plants appear in close proximity to the base of the mother plant.

    I use Acanthus mollis (Acanthus spinoissima is not readily available where I practice) as a structural plant to provide a focal point or textural contrast to fine textured material. A mature specimen definitely draws the eye and the large foliage provides screening.
    Sandy soil is much to its liking however, it does like moisture. I have seen the English landscape architect John Brooks use the plant extensively in his works and publications.

  3. Sam says:

    Sorry can’t help you b/c I don’t know what to do.

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